Protecting your outboard engine.

There are several ways to protect your outboard engine from the elements as well as thieves.  All moving parts should either be smeared with grease or lubricated with a light oil. Your manual will keep you right as to the type of oil or grease to use. Properly maintaining the moving parts will certainly reduce problems which usually occur when at sea.

The other form of protection for your outboard motor is security from theft. With thousands of boats now on their moorings all over Britain, it is a thieves paradise! Please make sure your outboard is visibly secured to the boat. This can be by bolts,;chain and padlock; sliding bar and padlock or any other method that will deter thieves.

Most thieves are looking for an easy, quick way to acquire the outboard engine. Normally, they will not want to spend an hour sawing through chain links or padlocks. So make it really difficult for them! If possible rig up a light – perhaps a solar light – that can illuminate the engine during the night. Thieves do not like to work with a light shining on them! If they see this type of set up they will move onto the next boat and ignore yours.

Most of the equipment mentioned above can be bought from our store. Follow this link to our store.

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Afloat! with twin engines.

Well its been a little bit later this season but finally we are afloat! Too many small jobs that needed doing delayed the launching this season. One of the not so little tasks was adding a second outboard motor to the boat. Previously on our catamaran we had a single 15 hp yamaha engine with a long shaft. Which was fine most of the time. However, my sister also has a catamaran but it is fitted with twin diesels and having been on hers when manoeuvring in the marina I just found the process so easy!

So I set about fitting twin outboards to my catamaran over the winter. There was a lot of debate about whether to change the 15 hp yamaha for a smaller engine, since I would have two outboards from now on. In otherwords, do I have two 15 hp engines or one 15 hp and another smaller, say 6 hp? Or do I have two 8 hp outboards instead? Finally, I reasoned it out. I originally bought the 15 hp outboard engine because the catamarn needed that size to power through all sorts of weather. Anything smaller was just struggling – especially in a force 6 headwind!

Two smaller outboards such as 2 x 8 hp, would both need to be going all the time when motoring in a headwind. This increases the fuel consumption as they would both be on almost maximum throttle just so the boat could make decent headway. So they were ruled out.

Keeping the 15 hp yamaha, which has proved reliable and efficient would make sense. Adding a second outboard was really just for easy movement in and out of marinas and harbours. So all I really needed was another reasonably sized outboard. That was the thinking process. However, it is not so simple. The 15 hp yamaha is electric start. You just turn the key! But an 8 hp outboard needs manual starting – pulling a cord to start! Not an easy task leaning over the stern of the catamaran! So the sensible reasoning was going out of the window as far as economics was concerned! I would need to look at a 9.9 hp outboard if I wanted electric start.

To cut a long story short I went for another 15 hp yamaha. I know it doesn’t make sense when you look at it at first, but lets consider a few things. Two matching sized engines on the stern of the cat look very good! I can now use each one alternatively. For example next week I intend using the port outboard engine when I need to, while the following week I will use the starboard engine. This will half each engines use – wear and tear so to speak. Each outboard on its own is now capable of getting me where I want to go, on its own. I only need to fire up both engines when in the confines of the marina or harbour. Ideal! Problem solved.

If you are considering fitting twin outboard engines to your boat why not visit our store to find real bargains!

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